HIV/AIDS

Are you ready for Sex ? The FAQ’s

I think I’m ready. What should I do before I have sex? This is a great question. It shows that you’re taking the time to think through this decision. Here are some things to consider when deciding whether becoming sexually active is what’s right for you at this point in your life. It’s important to think about all the potential things that could happen if you have sex with someone. There are good things—pleasure, a feeling of closeness,

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K-I-S-S-E-S

For many, kissing is one of the joys of life — plus kissing someone deeply is hot, hot, hot! And you want to be safe, as well. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) considers open-mouth kissing low-risk for transmitting HIV, especially if both partners are without sores or cuts on the mouth or lips. Saliva has certain proteins that make it an extremely poor carrier of HIV. As a result, kissing, sucking, and licking the lips, mouth,

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Keep it #REAL

My Theory DO YOU REALLY KNOW WHAT IT IS LIKE TO BE ME? LIVING DAY TO DAY WITH AN UNWANTED FRIEND CALLED "HIV" HAVE YOU EVER WALKED MY JAGGED PATH? THIS IS MY GRAPES OF WRATH DO YOU FEEL THE PAIN I FEEL? TRUST ME THIS IS REAL I NEVER THOUGHT IT WOULD BE ME THE ONE WHOM CONTRACTED HIV IT CREEPED AROUND THE CORNER WITH NO FOOTSTEPS TO HEAR 2.5 MILLION INFECTED LAST YEAR WITH NO CURE WE ALL LIVE IN FEAR I'LL STAND UP AND FIGHT WITHOUT SHEDDING A TEAR

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HIV Workshop for Abaco Youth

Recently, the Bahamas Red Cross, with assistance from partners in the National HIV Centre facilitated HIV Sensitization Workshops for youth in Abaco and Eleuthera.   Today, sessions have been conducted in Cooper's Town and Marsh Harbour Abaco and in Governor's Harbour, Spanish Wells and Harbour Island, Eleuthera.  Some 350 young people have been impacted by these sessions on both islands. These sessions are facilitated by the Bahamas Red Cross

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Sharing Your HIV Status

After you are diagnosed with HIV, you will have to decide whether to share that information with other people, and if so, whom you should tell. It is very important that you talk to your current and past sexual partners about your HIV status. If you have shared needles with others to inject drugs, you need to tell them too. If you are afraid or embarrassed to tell them yourself, your local Health Authorities can notify your sexual or needle-sharing

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Risky Business

All sexual practices can be made "safer"—meaning you can lower your risk of transmitting/contracting STIs and HIV—but some activities are much safer than others. Here's a list of sexual activities and the risks they pose for transmitting HIV or other STIs: Receptive Anal Sex (Bottoming) The odds of getting HIV from "bottoming" without a condom are higher than any other sexual behavior. HIV has been found in pre-cum (pre-ejaculatory fluid), so

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Signs & Symptoms of HIV

As early as 2-4 weeks after exposure to HIV (but up to 3 months later), people can experience an acute illness, often described as “the worst flu ever.” This is called acute retroviral syndrome (ARS), or primary HIV infection, and it’s the body’s natural response to HIV infection. During primary HIV infection, there are higher levels of virus circulating in the blood, which means that people can more easily transmit the virus to others. Symptoms

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Being HIV Positive Without Symptoms

Many people who are HIV-positive do not have symptoms of HIV infection. Often people only begin to feel sick when they progress toward AIDS (Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome). Sometimes people living with HIV go through periods of being sick and then feel fine. While the virus itself can sometimes cause people to feel sick, most of the severe symptoms and illnesses of HIV disease come from the opportunistic infections that attack a damaged immune

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How do you catch HIV/AIDS?

HIV is found in specific human body fluids. If any of those fluids enter your body, you can become infected with HIV. AIDS is the late stage of HIV infection, when a person’s immune system is severely damaged and has difficulty fighting diseases and certain cancers. Before the development of certain medications, people with HIV could progress to AIDS in just a few years. Currently, people can live much longer - even decades - with HIV before they

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Body Fluids & HIV

Which Bodily Fluid contains HIV?  HIV lives and reproduces in blood and other body fluids. We know that the following fluids can contain high levels of HIV: Blood Semen (cum) Pre-seminal fluid (pre-cum) Breast milk Vaginal fluids Rectal (anal) mucous Other body fluids and waste products—like feces, nasal fluid, saliva, sweat, tears, urine, or vomit—don’t contain enough HIV to infect you, unless they have blood mixed in them and you have significant

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